Orrin Woodward Net Worth vs. Net Impact

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Anyone who has spent any time around me at all will likely know that one of my favorite quotes (attributed to D.L. Moody) is:

Our greatest fear should not be that we will not succeed, but rather that we will succeed at something that doesn’t matter.”

It is easy to run for the wrong things in life.  We can fall prey to the world’s definition of success, going for glitter instead of gold.

So what really does matter in life? What is gold when it comes to achieving success?

I believe my friend and often co-author Orrin Woodward has expressed it well in a recent blog post (you can read it here).  His main point is that one can strive for Net Worth (in which money is stacked higher and higher) or Net Impact (in which people are served in the most important ways). I think we can all readily agree that striving after a success that serves people and changes lives is much more important than accumulating wealth.

Net Impact should trump Net Worth every time.

The particular cause Orrin uses to highlight this point is certainly worthy.  The evils of human trafficking, involving unspeakable injustices and crimes, should enrage us all.  I am thankful that people like Tim Ballard and organizations like his Operation Underground Railroad exist to fight those evils. That is why Terri and I are wholeheartedly supporting the Life on Life Initiative involving a partnering between All Grace Outreach and Operation Underground Railroad.  We are raising funds to help those who are in dire straights and cannot help themselves.

I’ll end with another famous quote (by Edmund Burke):

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

Good men and women are not doing nothing, they are taking action! I am proud of the many people in Life who are working toward their Net Impact by raising funds and awareness for this important issue. Thank you all! May your Net Impact be huge!

Sincerely,

Chris Brady

The Locus of Focus

This content was taken from the book Rascal, by Chris Brady.

These are busy times in which we live. Electronic media and technology have invaded nearly every aspect of our lives in the name of convenience. Many couples are each working jobs. Then there are the children, activities at church, chores around the house, banking and errands and obligatory parties and gatherings. Who among us hasn’t felt the pressure of the hustle and bustle of our modern way of living?

It seems as if “busyness” has infected us all. None of us in immune. It calls to mind the quote from Henry David Thoreau who wrote: “It is not enough to be busy, so too are the ants. The question is, what are we busy about?” I have always liked this quote, because it cuts directly to the heart of the matter. Author Marshall Goldsmith states, “It is time to stop dreaming of a time when you won’t be busy.”

Apparently, being busy is just part of life. It has probably always been this way since the days when gathering fire wood, hunting, and preparing meals consumed all of one’s time. But busyness is no excuse for lack of performance, or more importantly, lack of living an authentic, purposeful, significant life. We simply must find a way to cut through it all and make our days count.

Who hasn’t tried some sort of time management tool? Who hasn’t struggled to live according to one’s priorities? It all makes much more sense when we sit through the lecture series or read the brochures, but when it comes to truly living these principles, things seem to go awry.

Rascals, however, find a way. They understand their priorities and find a way to align their actions accordingly. There are several factors that play into this. As we have already discussed, one way is to have a clear and definite purpose in mind.

In the Bible we are told of three wise men traveling from the east around the time of the birth of Jesus. It is thought by historians that these men were likely from the land of Persia. A quick glance at the map shows many geographic obstacles between the heart of Persia and tiny Judea. We are told that these men traveled across these difficult and hazardous lands by following a bright star shining in the sky. This star provided a point of navigation to keep them on track no matter what challenges they encountered below; be it bandits, rivers, mountains, deserts, or jealous kings. In similar fashion, Rascals navigate through the pressures of their lives by progressing toward something solid and clean on their horizon. No matter what is encountered, a true Rascal can follow his own path if guided by a star in his future sky. Looking up is the best way to pass through things that can bring you down. It’s when your focus is bigger than your obstacles that you can make progress.

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Having clear and energizing goals is another major tactic to avoid the trap of busyness. Goals should be exciting, stretching, and specific. If they don’t exert a power to perform, then they are not believable enough, not specific enough, or not short-term enough.

Goals make prioritization easy. One can simply ask, “Will this help me get closer to my goal?” If not, it shouldn’t be done. Notice how difficult this becomes if there is no goal. But with a goal, once can look at anything and everything that comes along and determine, “Does this fit?” and “What’s important next?”

This is all critical because the enemy of great is “good.” There are literally millions of good things out there we could be doing with our time. There are pass-times and hobbies and people and places to visit, things to explore and activities with which to become involved. Any of these things may be fine on their own. However, if we do not learn to distinguish between great and good, we will waste countless hours doing good things while missing out on the great. Focus is so important, and if we have a clearly defined goal, making decisions about what is good and what is great to do next becomes easier in light of that goal.

There is another concept that we will call ‘pruning.’ This is something a Rascal does every time he feels the press of too many things or activities around him. Somehow he has allowed too many commitments, interests, or distractions into his life. The only prudent thing to do at this point is to make adjustments, deciding that some things simply have to go. Which activities are not central to achieving the goal? Which are not directly in line with life’s purpose? Which can wait until later? As hard as it may be, one has to get good at saying ‘no’ to a lot of good things in order to preserve space for the great things. In other words, a Rascal is slow to allow anyone to complicate his life.

It should be clear at this point that Rascals who achieve the most are the best at focusing upon what is most important in terms of their goals and overall purpose. They keep themselves free of the distractions of lesser things and ensure that their busyness is about something meaningful and in line with their larger purpose.

(Posted by Kristen Seidl, on behalf of Chris Brady)

How to Become a Mentor of Mentors

In their book Launching a Leadership Revolution, authors Chris Brady and Orrin Woodward wrote about the five levels of influence, teaching that understanding each is an important skill for great leaders. These levels include:

1. Learning
2. Performing
3. Leading
4. Developing leaders
5. Developing leaders who develop leaders

Great mentoring is all about levels four and five. Brady and Woodward said, “When we wrote the book, we didn’t know it would become a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestseller. We didn’t know that many thousands of people would embrace it and use it to build companies that build leaders. But we did know that leadership is only level 3, and that even more important than leadership is developing leaders.”

CB and OW quoteIn short, the greatest mentors don’t mentor only those they work with directly. Rather, they think of the people their mentees will mentor and even those who will be mentored
four or five generations ahead, and they help their mentees become the type of mentors who can become great mentors of mentors.

For example, consider how this works in a family setting. Some people focus on their career as the center point of life. Ask most people what they do in life, and they’ll say they’re a doctor, attorney, accountant, businessperson, engineer, or some other profession.

Sometimes, in contrast, we meet people who answer the same question by saying, “I’m a dad,” “I’m a father to three great children,” or “I’m a wife and mother.” While this cheeky answer frequently indicates that the person has given a lot of thought to his or her life purpose and priorities, the truth is that there is an even better way.

On one level, we can focus on our work life as the center of our purpose.

At a higher level, we can make our marriage and parental relationships the top priority.

At an even better level, we can be the kind of parents who wisely and consciously raise our grandkids—even when our own kids are just little. This means thinking through what we’re really doing as parents. Are we just career people who happen to have kids? Hopefully not.

Likewise, are we spouses and parents raising kids to be confident, contributing adults? This is a good step.

Or are we, above all, future grandparents who are raising our kids to be fantastic parents who themselves will raise their children in a way that positively influences several generations to come? Those who see their role in such far-reaching generational terms will approach their marriage and parenting in a purposeful way.

The same applies to business mentoring. If we mentor only the people with whom we work directly, we won’t be as helpful to them as if we see our role as one of mentoring them to be great mentors of mentors.

(This excerpt was taken from the Life Essentials Series book, Mentoring Matters. Posted by Kristen Seidl, on behalf of Chris Brady)

Grateful Alive

There is an old rock band (with a heavy emphasis on old) named The Grateful Dead. I have never really listened to their music and don’t know much about them, but apparently, they have a huge cult following and have made quite a career out of live performances. They may be very good, for all I know. However, I have never been able to get around their stupid and morbid name. Grateful Dead? What in the world does that mean? Is it someone’s attempt at being clever? Is it supposed to be counter-intuitive? Is it meant to be shocking?

Some questions, such as these, aren’t really worth pursuing very far. When it comes right down to it, the origin behind a rock band name chosen decades ago by some musicians isn’t very important. But the concept their name evokes, or rather, the opposite of that concept, is being grateful for being alive. Now this is a worthy topic!

quote pic 7Life is magnificently rich and complex, wonderful and varied, pleasurable and diverse. It is so indescribably impossible to describe that one can’t even begin to describe it. We all know about life because we are all alive. We know it as well as anyone could know a thing because we are it. We experience it every second of our existence with every breath we take. However, much like a fish in water, we are so close to it that we often don’t even think of it at all.

And that, I think, explains how we can get off track in our attitudes about life. We are so used to being alive that we take it for granted.

No one wants to be around someone like that. But in truth, if we are honest, all of us have had lapses in our lives when we too were not as grateful as we should have been. We have had moments when we have forgotten the many blessings we have and all the things for which we should be thankful.

Remind yourself to strive to be the kind of person who notices the gift of life, maintains the sense of wonder at all this world holds in store, and is deeply grateful for every little blessing that comes your way. As a result, you will be happier and more fulfilled, with the added bonus that you will be more enjoyable to be around as well.

While it is true that no one wants to be around an ungrateful person, the opposite is that people will clamor to be in your presence when you are appreciative and grateful, thankful and polite.

You’re welcome!

Chris Brady

Winners Play Hurt

The following excerpt was taken directly from Chris Brady’s book, Rascal:

Health is a gift we often take for granted until it is compromised. When sick or ill, we hark back to the healthful days with longing; yearning to feel better again and regain our former vitality. None of us is going to be healthy forever. All will experience sickness and debilitation, to different degrees, to be sure. And to be clear, there are significant, debilitating illnesses which will quite literally take a Rascal out of his game for a period, and in extreme cases, permanently. But that doesn’t mean we can’t have a good attitude in the midst of the toil and realize that for a vast majority of afflictions, we will simply have to tough it out and press through it. Truth be told, many of the great achievements throughout the ages have been done by Rascals who simply had to tough it out through sickness, pain, discomfort, or whatever. When all else fails, toughness alone can be a powerful weapon to keep one in the field.

There is an interesting concept I’ve discovered by watching champions of all kinds: winners learn to play hurt. Everyone experiences sickness and pain, heartache and hurt feelings, brokenness and despair. Pestilence, hunger, disease, sickness, and injury have plagued humanity since the fall. These facts are true for rich and poor alike. The famous, lucky, beautiful and gifted all suffer as do the obscure, unlucky, ugly and average. In fact, in light of that truth, these superficial labels start to lose their power to classify people. In the end, we are all living under the same set of human conditions where pain, suffering, and setbacks are just a way of life.

Rascals understand these rules of the game and learn to press on regardless. In a literal illustration, top level professional athletes learn to continue the season with wrapped injuries and pain-killers. Sitting in chill tubs or massage rooms after the games, they work through the pain to ready their bodies to perform again. Most sports are played by athletes with injuries and damaged bodies.

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I will never forget a particular National Football League game in Texas years ago. The Dallas Cowboys were aiming to make it to Super Bowl XXVIII and playing a late season game at home against the New York Giants. Home field advantage for the playoffs was on the line and the Giants were giving the Cowboys a rough time of it. It looked bleak for the Cowboys when in the second quarter, star running back Emmitt Smith went down hard on the frozen surface and separated his left shoulder. The pain was evident in his face. Smith went off the field drooping his shoulder and wincing. Surprisingly, though, Smith came back into the game. He ran the ball again and got tackled hard. Slow to get up, Smith made his way back to the huddle for another play. Smith ran the ball or caught passes again, and again, and again. Each time it appeared it was all he could do just to get back up. Somehow, though, Emmitt Smith managed to carry the ball just one more time. Said Smith years afterward, “I’m in the huddle saying to myself, ‘No pain, no pain,’ I’m just talking to myself, ‘no pain,’ and tears are rolling out of my eyes, I’m trying to convince myself there’s no pain, but I was feeling all the pain!” Teammate Michael Irving said of Smith’s resilient play that day, “He stood up and played, I mean he just played and played and played. I’ve never seen a performance like that!” The statistics say it all. That afternoon, Emmitt Smith had the ball for 42 of the Cowboys’ 70 offensive plays, with 32 runs for 170 yards and 10 catches for 62 more. The Cowboys defeated the New York Giants that day, securing home field advantage for a playoff run that would indeed see them win the Super Bowl.

The converse of this type of performance might be called “loser’s limp.” We’ve probably all seen it before: a defensive football player gets beat on a play, gives chase to the offensive player carrying the ball toward the end-zone, then upon seeing that the chase is futile, pulls up with a feigned injury as an excuse.

In life, people can choose to either play hurt or adopt a loser’s limp. A loser’s limp involves finding some excuse, any excuse, to explain away the lack of success. It’s as if these people are searching for an explanation good enough to get them off the hook. And in fact, when it comes to choosing not to succeed, any excuse will do. It is one thing to make excuses for lack of performance to others, and that is bad enough. But the saddest excuse is the one a person sells to himself. Unfortunately, many will work very hard to convince others of the excuse they have chosen to adopt for themselves. The only problem is that any excuse they have for not accomplishing something has already been used by somebody else as the very reason for accomplishing it! The difference is whether or not someone is willing to play hurt!

(Posted by Kristen Seidl, on behalf of Chris Brady)

Three Steps for Leaders in the Fog of Battle

“When things get tough, when times get hard, when the way seems unclear, finding someone to help, love, and serve is the biggest pressure reliever known to man.” – Chris Brady 

Leaders must deal in reality, and often that reality is complicated and ever changing. Complexity, however, is no excuse for lack of results. Leaders, despite their circumstances, the pressures they face, the long odds they brave, and the machinations against them, are still, in the end, held accountable for their results. If there were a Leadership Hall of Fame (as I think there should be), there would certainly be no section dedicated to the “Yeah, buts.”

So what is a leader to do? How best to battle difficult circumstances and unfair pressures? The key is to keep things simple.

Three Steps:

  1. Remember your purpose
  2. Focus on priorities
  3. Find someone to serve

The easiest way to do this is to go all the way to the “thirty thousand foot view”, and remember your overall purpose. Just what got you into this position of responsibility in the first place? At one point, I would hope, you were convinced that what you were doing was worthwhile. What was the basis for that decision? Why did it matter so much to you? More succinctly, what was the vision you had of what could be? What part of the status quo did you absolutely deplore? You see, leaders are leaders because they find something they cannot stand to leave the way they found it. Some situation seemed wrong to them, or perhaps not as right as it could be. Somebody was hurting or suffering and needed a leader to step in. Someone was being wronged and needed defending. Some rule was unfair. Some government was unlawful. Some person was disrespectful. Some project was unfinished. These are the roots of leadership, because they speak firstly to a leader’s discontent. Automatically, when a person of character is confronted with such a situation, they become a leader because they cannot stand to leave the situation the way they found it. A vision forms in their mind of how things could be better, they cannot let go of it, nor it of them. The vision of what things could be like causes a hunger inside the leader for change. The tension that a leader feels when considering his or her vision, is priceless, because it is the driving force behind leadership. A leader confronted with unfair circumstances and overwhelming pressures must first go back to the vision and his or her overriding purpose in life. From there, everything will look a little clearer.

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The next thing to do is prioritize amid the fog. Find out the one or two BEST things to do, and get started on them right away. Remember, there are a lot of GOOD things to do, but usually only one or two BEST things to do. Focus upon those and temporarily disregard the rest. As the Bible says, Sufficient for the day is the evil thereof.”

After remembering his or her purpose and focusing on priorities, the leader must next find someone to serve. When things get tough, when times get hard, when the way seems unclear, finding someone to help, love, and serve is the biggest pressure reliever known to man.

A leader who implements these three basics during the “fog of battle” will be surprised at his or her results. After all, results are what a leader is held accountable for.

Sincerely,

Chris Brady

Life As a Layer Cake

How do you decide what to do with the time that’s been given to you? This is a question most people ponder their entire lives. In Chris Brady’s classic talk, Life as a Layer Cake, he attempts to answer this question by providing a thoughtful illustration you won’t soon forget.

To somewhat review…

There’s a dichotomy of advice on how to approach your life:

Viewpoint A – “Be successful but hate what you do.”

Viewpoint B – “Love what you do but never succeed.”

Because these are two very separate paths, how do you decide which one is right?

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It may help to create your own layer cake and personalize it to your life.

  1. What preparatory and preliminary experiences do you have that have shaped who you are? (education, up-bringing, learning experiences)
  2. What is your pragmatic occupation? (pays the bills and provides for your needs)
  3. Do you have a passionate pursuit? (something that fulfills you)
  4. Are you chasing a purposeful calling? (significance, contribution)

There are multiple dimensions of what it takes to be complete in your life.

“We need ALL of these layers to maximize our potential and feel the most fulfilled and happy. The larger and more developed each layer is, the more complete, fulfilled and happy you will feel.” – Chris Brady

(Posted by Kristen Seidl, on behalf of Chris Brady)